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Tue, Apr. 22nd, 2008, 03:07 pm
itypedthis:

I'm considering going to college for fine arts but I'm afraid I won't be able to pay back my loans once I graduate. All I've heard about fine arts is that you basically make little to no stable money in it.

What kinds of GOOD paying jobs [if any] can you get with a fine arts degree and WHERE can you get them? State wise. I live in PA if that helps any.

Also, someone suggested to solve my problem I should double major. Good idea or bad idea? Would I be able to work a part time job? My parents aren't going to fork out money for food/gas/school supplies so I will NEED a job while going to school. What's it like to take double majors while you're in school?

Mon, Apr. 28th, 2008 02:51 am (UTC)
younmm23

This is a great question. Fine arts is a tricky thing. And it depends on what sort of route you go with it. If you go more arts management, there is much more of a chance of a stable job.

I totally agree with the double major thing. Length of time it will take you to finish college depends on the college. Two great "second majors" are going to be Communication and Business Administration. They are quick majors to finish off and are very applicable to fine arts careers, and are still "legit" majors if you decide later on in life that you are done with the fine arts thing.

In the end, talk to a major advisor (or admissions counselor, etc) about what your path would look like if you double majored. At my school, you can double major in theater and communication and be done in 5 1/2 years, which isn't bad, since theater takes 4 1/2.

Wed, May. 7th, 2008 02:21 am (UTC)
bbkitty

The answers to both of your questions vary greatly.

As for fine arts careers, it depends on where your concentration is. Most schools allow (or force) you to choose a medium in which to concentrate your studies on, which may or may not be reflected in your actual degree (some schools print it, some don't), but will give you training to work in varying art fields. Some good career-oriented concentrations are Illustration, Graphic Design, and Jewelry. The key is to train yourself in marketable mediums.

Double majoring varies between schools and the majors you choose. For example, a friend of mine is double majoring in Japanese and East Asian Studies, and only needs to take an extra 2 courses to fulfil all requirements for both. I discussed with my advisor about double-majoring in Fine Arts and Japanese, and we figured out that it would pretty much be an extra 3 years of school (needless to say, I'm now only minoring in Japanese.) So if you were to double major in, say, Graphic Design and ITS or Computer Programming, it wouldn't be too much of a strain, and would put you in a good position for a job.

I also recamend looking beyond the traditional private Fine Arts Colleges, since they tend to cost an arm and a leg and have few options for academic exploration outside of the Fine Arts. I'm attending a large State University, which is allowing me to get a BFA and my minor in what will equate to about 5 years of school (counting my 2.5 years at a different University)

Wed, Aug. 27th, 2008 12:17 am (UTC)
checkmatey

do not go to art institute of Pittsburgh
costs too much